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Chrome-Frets Fret And String Polish

22 October 2009 2 Comments

chromefretsguitar

Look at those frets.  Shiny or what?  They’ve been treated to a good cleaning and polishing with Chrome-Frets.

Chrome-Frets uses a solution of liquid PTFE (or Teflon) with cleaners and a very gently wax to clean and, essentially, lubricate your fretboard and, should you wish, your strings.  The lubricant has a dry feel and doesn’t feel sticky to play on – quite the opposite.  You’re left with a clean and fast-playing neck.

chromefretsThe package comes with a bottle of the cleaning/lubricating solution, a leather cleaning pad, and a tough cloth.  In addition, the bottle-top has a felt applicator built in for individual string cleaning and lubricating.

Application is pretty easy and the results seem impressive.

There is no silicon in the solution, which is a good thing – I don’t like it when silicon and guitar finishes mix as it can play havoc with any future finish repairs or touch-ups.

Chrome-Frets was developed by Richard Hinchcliff for his own use and interest in the product has led to his developing it commercially.  Major kudos to Richard.

There is an excellent demo-video at the Chrome-Frets website that shows how it can be used.

As a luthier, I polish frets pretty regularly.  I do it the old-fashioned way.  On the basis of what I’ve seen of Chrome-Frets I’ll be getting a couple of packs to test.  I suspect it may well save me a lot of time and effort.

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Written by: Gerry Hayes
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2 Comments »

  • George Putnam said:

    PTFE (Teflon) is very toxic.

    http://www.pristineplanet.com/newsletter/2006/05.asp

  • Gerry Hayes (Article Author) said:

    Hi George. While I can’t claim to be a chemist, I had been under the understanding that PTFE was safe unless heated to a pretty high temperature. A quick WIKI of this seems to bear this out (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polytetrafluoroethylene). While you could, if you so wished, make some sort of argument about its use in cookware, I’d probably venture that even seriously fast shredding would not heat your guitar strings to the 350°C (660°F) necessary to cause the PTFE decomposition deemed necessary to ill effects.